Callahan’s

Revolutionary War records
1782 Washington Co. VA-Capt. Fulkison Precinct Personal
Property List: Edward Callahan: Horses 13, Cattle 10, 400 acres on North side of n. fork of Holstein. Actual settlement made in 1774. Listed on Washington Co., VA Surveyors Record 1781-1797.

Nov. 29, 1794 Rockingham County, NC Land Deed . Deed book D:231
Ezekiel Callahan , Edward Callahan , Nathaniel Callahan, Jane Calahan, Darby Hopper, Jones Parrish and Unity Callahan to Robert Gilmore for 26 pounds Va money 53 1/4 A on S side Matrimony Cr. adj. John Hopper. Nov. 29, 1794. John Gibson, Philip Rose, Jesse Harris.

DEC 1801 -Came to Kentucky in Dec 1801 with William Strong and family, Daniel Davidson and 3 sons Samuel, John and Robert, with their families-also Roger and Robin Cornett. William Strong, Samuel Davidson, and the two Cornetts had each married th e daughters of Edward Callahan.
North Carolina Marriages to 1825
Callahan, Edward
Groom: Edward Callahan
Bride: Mary Nickles
Bond Date: 23 Oct 1768
Bond #: 000123342
Level Info: North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868

Image Num: 005866
County: Rowan
Record #: 01 049
Bondsman: John Callahan; George Felsom
Witness: Thoms Frohock

Notes for MAHALA SUSANNAH BROCK:
Mahala Susannah Brock

She was Cherokee according to records of her grandson Samuel Cornett.

1810 Census lists 10 slaves attached to the household.

More About EDWARD CALLAHAN and MAHALA BROCK:
Marriage: Abt. 1767, Washington county, Virginia

·       Surname: Callahan
Given Name: Edward
NICK: Ned
Sex: M
Birth: 1743 in Rockingham County, Virginia 1 2
Death: 1823 in Clay County, Kentucky 1 2
Reference Number: 880
_UID: 694B9EF04336354284F90F1C1DEAFA9C773A
Note:
1782 Washington Co.,VA-Capt. Fulkison’s Precinct Personal
Property List: Edward Callahan: Horses 13, Cattle 10, 400 acres on Northside of n. fork of Holstein. Actual settlement made in 1774. Listed on Washington Co., VA Surveyors Record 1781-1797.
Came to Kentucky in Dec 1801 with William Strong and family, Daniel Davidson and 3 sons Samuel, John and Robert, with their families-also Roger and Robin Cornett. William Strong, Samuel Davidson, and the two Cornetts had each married the daughters of Edward Callahan.
SOURCE: Deborah Callahan Schramm; dcschramm@comcast.net, She is a 5th great granddaughter of Edward & Mahala Brock Callahan.
NOTE: Edward Callahan born ca 1743. Edward and Susannah were bought into court in Montgomery co. Va. for living together and not being married and having children out of wedlock. Their daughter Jennie Callahan married William Strong. They moved in 1800 from Russell County, Virginia to Floyd County, Kentucky in 1807 Clay County KY was formed from Floyd County.

1810 Clay County Census: Page 156
MALES under 10 10-16 16-26 26-45 45 and over
FEMALES under 10 10-16 16-26 26-45 45 and over

Edward Callahan 0 0 0 0 1 – 0 0 0 0 1 – 10
This is Edward Callahan and his wife Mahala Susan Brock. they don’t have any children living at home, their son Isaac is married and living next door to them. Edward has 10 slaves attached to this household.

Isaac Callahan 0 0 1 0 0 – 1 0 1 0 0 – 0
Male 16-26,1, born between 1784 and 1794, Isaac Callahan
Female 0-10,1, born between 1800 and 1810
Female 16-26,1, born between 1784 and 1794, Mahala Wilson, d/o of Phillip Wilson

The 1810 Clay County Census shows him as being married already and having one daughter.
Isaac Callahan married Mahala Wilson on the 25 July 1810 in Clay County Kentucky.

Isaac Callahan was hanged in Manchester, Kentucky in 1817 for the murder of Samuel Newberry.

1820 Clay County Census: Page 114
MALES under10 10-16 16-18 16-26 26-45 45 and over
FEMALES under10 10-16 16-25 26-45 45 and over
FREE COLORED m-f
SLAVES m-f

Edw. Callahan 2 0 0 1 0 1 – 2 1 1 0 1 – 0 – 3m4f
FWM [0-10], 2, born between 1810 and 1817
FWM [16-26],1, born between 1794 and 1804
FWM [45+], 1, this is Edward Callahan Isaac Callahan father.
FWF [0-10], 2,
FWF [10-16],1, this is Isaac daughter. born before 1810.
FWF [16-25], 1, if Isaac was hung in 1817 then this is Mahala Wilson Isaac Callahan Wife.
FWF [45+], 1, this is Mahala Susan Brock

Page 115
Phillip Wilson 0 0 0 0 1 0 – 3 0 1 0 1 – 0 – 0
Male 26,45, 1
Female 0-10,3
Female 16-25,1
Female 45+,1

Father: Darby CALLAHAN b: Abt 1720 in Virginia
Mother: Unity HARRIS b: Abt 1720 in Virginia

Marriage 1 Mahala Susan BROCK b: Abt 1749 in Cumberland Co, Virginia
Married: Apr 1770 in Virginia
Marriage 1 Mahala Susannah “Sukey” BROCK b: 1749 in Cumberland Co., VA
Married: 1773 in Montgomery Co., VA
Event: info
Note: brought to court for having Bastard Children out of wedlock and forced to marry on the spot…. Sukey’s father was Indian and her husband was at least half Indian…
Change Date: 3 May 2004
Copied from The Hurst Manuscript

The Strong family of Breathitt and Owsley Counties in Kentucky, was established by William Strong, who was born about the year 1768 in Virginia and died about 1848. He was married about the year 1790 to Jennie ( Jane ) Callahan, who was born about 1769nd died in 1815. She was the daughter of Edward Callahan and Mahalia Brock. Mahalia was the daughter of Aaron Brock and sister of Jessie Brock who lived in Harlan County. The Brocks were part indian. William Strong was the son of Daniel and grandson of John Strong. They originally came from Ireland. Before coming to Kentucky William lived in Holston Springs in Scott County, Virginia. About the year 1800 or 1801, a party was organized in Scott County, Virginia to come to Kentucky. This party was composed of Edward Callahan and family- William Strong and family- Daniel Davidson and three sons, Samuel, John and Robert and their families- also Roger and Robin Cornett. Some reports say that the Cornetts came a year or two previous to this time. The above parties brought with them their livestock- household goods- slaves and other possesions. William Strong, Samuel Davidson and the two Cornetts married daughters of Edward Callahan. After arriving in Kentucky they settled on the north fork of the Kentucky river at and near the mouth of Grapevine creek in what is now called Perry County. William Strong acquired a tract of land on the opposite side of the river from the mouth of Grapvine Creek. It extended from near what is now Chavies down the river as to include Strong’s Branch. On this land he erected a log cabin where he made his home for some eight to ten years. William, as a deputy assessor, made the first assessment of all land and personal property on the north fork, which was then embraced in the new county of Clay. He was the leader of the ” North Forkers” in the infamous ” cattle wars” which began in the year 1806 between the citizens of the North Fork and Red Bird, tributary of the South Fork. This feud extended over a period of years and a number of men lost their lives and a large number of cattle were killed. The South Forkers were led by Joh Gilbert who later became a noted preacher. About the year 1812 Strong acquired a large tract land further down river in what is now Breathitt County. It included most of the land from the Haddix lands above the mouth of Troublesome Creek and extended up river to some some distance above the mouth of George’s Branch. He erected a residence on the west side of the river about a mile below the mouth of George’s Branch, where he resided most of the time thereafter. In the later years of his life he lived a portion of his time on Meadow Creek in which is now part of Owsley County. He was a small man with a quick temper who walked with a cane because of a short leg caused from being broken in his youth. William Strong became a Baptist preacher in his later years. He acquired much land, most of which he left to his children. He owned 1400 acres on Meadow Creek, also 400 acres near the present site of Boonesville. He also owned land on Lost Creek. After the death of his wife in 1815, he was married a second time on July 7, 1816 to Patsey Pennington, who was born 1775 in North Carolina and died about 1856, She was the widow of Abel Pennington, Sr. By his first wife William had ten children, eight sons and two daughters. They were, Edward, John, Moses, Thomas, William, Polly, Alexander, Isaac, Isabell, and Henry H. He had no children from his second marriage.

William Strong was born in Pittsylvania County, Virginia in 1768 and died in Breathitt County, Kentucky, 1848. His first marriage was in about April 1790, Rockingham County, Virginia to Jane Callahan. Jane was born in Scott County, Virginia to Edward and Mahala Susan (Brock) Callahan in 1791; she died in Chavies, Perry County, Kentucky in about 1815. William became a prominent land owner of Kentucky. He first obtained land on the North Fork of the Kentucky River, near the mouth of Grapevine Creek. This land measured from near Chavies to down the river and past Strong’s Branch. He built a log cabin home and lived there for 8 to 10 years. He was the Deputy Tax Assessor of newly formed Clay County and made the first real and personal property tax collection on the North Fork. William was the leader of the North Forkers during the cattle war which began in 1806, a war that continued for many years, leaving a bloody heritage for future generations. This cattle war was between people who lived on the North Fork and those who lived on the Red Bird, a branch of the South Fork. It was only the first of many feuds to develop in Breathitt County, Kentucky. In about 1812, William purchased more land down the river in what would later become Breathitt County, which was formed from Clay County. This land stretched from above the mouth of Troublesome Creek to past the mouth of George’s Branch. He built a home on the west side of the river, about one mile below George’s branch and remained there most of his life, other than the few years he lived in Owsley County on Meadow Creek. Records have stated that William was a short man with a quick temper. He walked with a cane because of a broken leg that had not healed properly. In later years he became a Baptist Minister, owning vast amounts of land, which he gave to his children. 1400 acres on Meadow Creek, 400 acres near Booneville, and other acreage on Lost Creek.

Henry Harrison Strong

·       Edward “Ned” Callahan was half Cherokee. His mother was a Cherokee Indian.
1782: Washington County, Virginia – Captain Fulkison’s Precinct – Personal Property List: Edward Callaham: Horses 13, Cattle 10, 400 acres on Northside of North Fork of Holstein. Actual settlement made in 1774. Listed on Washington County, Virginia Surveyors Record 1781-1797.
Came to Kentucky in December 1801 with William Strong and family, Daniel Davidson and 3 sons, Samuel, John, and Robert and their families, also Roger and Robin Cornett, William Strong, Samuel Davidson, and the two Cornett’s had each married the daughters of Edward Callahan.

From note on tree on Ancestry.com

 

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